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Monday, June 29, 2020

Local Fishing Report June 29, 2020

Well gang, we're almost half way through summer...and things really picked up in the last stretch. The bite has finally stabilized and it is time to fish Around the area most water temps are in the mid to high 70's. Weed growth and baitfish populations are at about average for this time of year.

If you're a newbie or casual fisherman....keep it simple. Get some leeches or small suckers and fish them on a slip sinker or lindy rig. Just keep the line tight and put your boat around the deep edges of some visible weeds. You will catch fish.

If you're looking to cast some lures...try a lipless crankbait.  Just cast it at any weeds you see, and reel it in as fast as you can.

Panfish Looking for action? Small panfish can be caught in shallow water using a small hook, bobber and live bait, especially around docks or swim platforms. The better sized fish are being caught out of the deeper water (12-18 or 20-32 FOW) by anglers drifting and fishing vertically. If you're on a deep school, but not catching keepers, get your bait down a little deeper. Electronics are your friend when targeting suspended panfish, but nothing helps more than a steady breeze for a natural drift. I've been consistently finding good panfish action about 12-15 foot down over deeper water or on weed edges/sand grass at its deepest on long mainlake points.

Largemouth bass have moved into more traditional summer patterns.  Look for them in inside weed edges in 4-6 FOW  and the outside edges in 8-15 FOW. These fish can be caught on a variety of tackle, spinnerbaits, crankbaits, texas rigged plastics, wacky worms, jigworms, jig and chunks, skirted grubs and tubes. Piers are holding fish and the slop has been pretty good, especially in the mid-day and late afternoons. If you just want to catch fish, keep it simple...leeches, chubs or small suckers on a lindy or slip sinker rig along a deep weed edge is an easy way to put some fish in the boat on just about any area lake.

Smallmouth bass fishing was fairly good this past week. Fish are using rocky points and bars especially early and later in the day. Watch for current, it pulls them in to feed, but most of the fish are holding on the deep side of breaks or suspending off mainlake structure, coming in briefly to forage. Skirted grubs, twister tails, tubes, wacky worms, lipless crankbaits, jerkbaits or floating rapalas are your best tackle options, but live bait like leeches and small suckers has been working for the people doing slow controlled trolling in the deep sandgrass in 18-25 feet.

Walleye fishing has been red hot the last week or so. Fish continue to be caught along outside weed edges or off deeper flats with sandgrass. Slip bobbers or split shot rigs with live bait or suckers, backtrolled on lindy or a slip-sinker rig has been producing, but the pre-dawn and post-dusk hour has been delivering the larger fish. Fishing over the tops of weed clumps near breaklines with floating rapala minnows or rip jigging has been producing as well, especially early and late in the day. Most fish are being caught along weededges in 12-18 FOW, but I've been catching them as shallow a 7' and as deep as 25'.

Pike fishing has been about average with lots of smaller pike being reported. Active fish are using the shallow weedflats to feed on th huge schools pf small baitfish, including the recent bloom of juvenile panfish. Fish with inline spinners, lipless crankbaits, small bucktails or buzzbaits tight to scattered weedclumps in 4-8 FOW. Larger pike were harder to come by according to most reports, but if you want to chase them, try the weedline in 12-18 feet of water and fish with suckers or large shiners on a slip sinker rig, or rip some deep grass with a jig and reaper, spoon or jerkbait.

Musky: target suspended fish out over deeper on smaller lipless crankbaits, gliders and bucktails. A few fish have been caught off the weedline on larger swimbaits. Anglers continue to report lots and lots of lazy follows this season. 12-15 FOW seems to be the magic depth and weeds on the end of points have been the hotspots for action over the past 8-10 days.


If you've got specific questions: Feel free to email me.

Good Luck, and stay safe and healthy.

Cheers,
CT

Friday, June 19, 2020

Fishing Report 6-19-2020

Hey gang.

Fishing has been fairly inconsistent the last couple of weeks. Everything seems a little "off" for this time of year. Going back in the logs doesn't really have anything comparable (In June, anyway), and my logs go back a fair amount of time, covering a range of conditions. I've been out for at least a few hours most days this week, and I've had successful trips, but without fail I'm catching the bulk of my fish before 9am. I was surprised that the stable weather didn't make fishing very consistent, but that really hasn't been my experience.

That's not to say you can't catch fish, you should just plan on working a little harder for them. Fishing is always a game of averages, and right now. it isbest to play the percentages in your favor. Fish in lower light time periods, focus on protected or shady areas during the middle part of the day.

Water temps are in the Mid 70's. Weeds are quickly starting to come in. Fish were biting light, but beyond that it was hard to pattern them.

Reminder: Golden Lake's Launch will close on Monday. They will repairing the parking lot, and as I understand it, there will be no parking available at the launch for at least a week.

Around the area...Panfish, especially bluegills are finishing the spawn on many local lakes. Look for active fish along the inside edges of weedlines at the end of sand or gravel points. Most of the nests in the shallow areas have been cleaned off with so many people out on the lakes, but if you look for bedding fish in the 8-12 or 15-17 FOW range, you'll catch the bigger ones, and you'll still find fish on the beds. Crappies were a hot bite this week while weather was stable especially over the deeper attractors/brushpiles. Fish them vertical with plastics or tail hooked minnows.

Largemouth bass are still schooled up and chasing bait on the weedy flats with scattered cover,  so expect to catch lots of smaller fish in groups with some dead time between little flurries of action. Weeds=fish right now, and with the limited number of weeds around, you can find schools of fish in or near the weeds you find. If you find some fish, work them hard. That's how you'll likely to find the best success. The old maxim: Don't leave fish to find fish is very true right now.

The unstable weather on the way will likely jump start then crush bass activity for a few days, but if you can find some fish...presentations made slow and very tight to cover (like flipping or texas rigged plastics for example) will still catch fish. I've been trying to downsize to account for the tougher bite, it hasn't always worked, but it has given me the opportunity to find some fish.

If the wind is laying down, one of my better guiding tricks for these conditions has always been to twitch a size 9 or 11 floating rapala minnow, pop-r or pop-x around shallow structure/cover. After the weekend, if we get some sunny days look for some quality fish around rock bars or points where wacky, skirted grubs or tubes will really shine. Consider getting off the bank and look for fish on mid depth flat areas. That said, don't ignore the slop and docks during the middle parts of the day, especially the mid-afternoon bite from about 2-4pm.

Smallmouth could be a tough bite until conditions stabilize mid next week. You'll be doing some hunting, so I'd throw spinnerbaits and grubs for smallmouth but a crawfish pattern crankbait bounced through the sand and rock transition areas in 8-15 FOW might just be what "Dr Chris" ordered. (Yes, I'm actually a Doctor.) Don't over look a finesse wacky rig or even live bait, especially if you can find some fish out deep.

Northern Pike are less effected by the weather than most other gamefish species. If the bite is tough, throw spinnerbaits, buzzbaits or lipless crankbaits around shallow patches of weeds for some action. Bigger fish can be taken on slip sinker rigs tipped with larger bait. Buzzbaits will trigger some action fish, or consider a jerkbait like a rouge or husky jerk. Pulling steel spinner harnesses along the outside weed edges is sure to turn on soon, but I haven't spent any time doing it yet.

Walleye: Biting on live bait and smaller plastics, but the bite has been very tough and patterning fish nearly impossible. Rip jig weeds in 8-12 FOW if you can find them, or sandgrass flats in 18-22 FOW.  Live bait options: leeches, shiners or nightcrawlers are probably better on a slip sinker/lindy rig, otherwise I'd stay finesse with slip bobbers or small jigs  for the weekend and the early part of the week, but if things pick up...it is primetime for floating or countdown minnow baits. Let the fish have the bait for an extra second right now before you crack them.

Musky has been the story of lazy follows. Fish are active, but catching them has been tougher. Look for musky fishing to really pick up after this next front goes through. Most of the fish I have been hearing about have been sub 40" fish.

Friday, June 5, 2020

Fishing Report June 5, 2020

Hey gang,

As we head into the annual free fishing weekend , you're going to find a range of conditions around the area.

Water temps are in the mid to high 70's on most lakes, water clarity has been surprisingly good despite some very high water and the heavy rains we've had. What does vary lake to lake the most is weed growth.

I have no explanation for this. Some lakes have some really developed standing weeds this season, others, even ones where there's usually some solid growth, just aren't there yet. In practical terms this means it can be hard to pin down fish on the lakes with scattered weeds, as they are using different areas.

As for fishing, it is what you would expect for early June.

After that warm weather, the panfish (bluegills anyway) have started to move up onto their beds. Sandy or pea gravel areas in the shallows will all have some panfish, but typically the better keepers come from areas where nests can be in 8-12 FOW. Lots of approaches will work, but when fishing for spawning gills remember there's always lots of smaller fish in the area. Small plastics tipped with waxworms, or a leaf worm. helgramite, on panfish leech on a small red or gold hook with a split shot or slip sinker really can get the job done, but don't be afraid to bust out the slip bobbers for deeper panfish.

People are still catching some nice crappies, but consistent numbers have been hard to produce. A few crappies are being caught over deeper water near mainlake structure, and you may still find a few spawning crappies are in shallow bays near weeds, wood laydowns or reeds. Minnows, hooked through the tail on a small hook (#8 or #10), waxworms and plastics have all been taking fish.

A handful of bass are still spawning, but not many. Topwaters and crankbaits are catching fish over open water areas, especially if you can find some isolated standing weed patches on the mid-depth flats in 6-12 feet of water. Early mornings have been tough, but there has been an amazing bite mid mornings. On the sunny afternoons, the fish have been tighter to cover in 3-8 feet of water and fishing around the docks and in the slop has been picking up a bit, especially late in the afternoon. Overall fish are shallower than you'd think they should be. Plastics: Texas rigged lizards, tube jigs skirted grubs, and wacky worms are all catching fish, as always, if the bite is tough, try a jigworm. Live bait (shiners >suckers) or leeches on slip sinker rigs are catching a few fish for anglers making solid drifts over productive areas.

Chasing smallmouth this weekend? Minnowbaits, like size 11 or 13 floating rapalas are actually a great way to catch these fish. Keep it simple, black and silver or chartruese and white are the best. If it warms up this weekend and the early part of next week, look for them on sand/rock transition areas and  target them with tubes, skirted grubs or twister tail grubs.

Walleye  are still using shallow weeds and weed edges in 6-12 feet. Slip Bobbers, jigging with live bait or drifting with lindy rigs have been productive, especially when using small suckers or leeches for bait. In the evening, a few anglers are still catching fish by working rapala minnow baits over isolated weed clumps on mainlake points and humps, but this bite also dropped off with the weather changes this past week.

Northern Pike fishing was slow, but steady. The best way to catch pike is a small sucker or medium to large shiner on a slip sinker rig with a flourocarbon leader. Drift along the deeper edges of the weeds you can find in 12-18 feet. Up shallow- Lipless crankbaits, buzzbaits and spinner baits are still producing.

Musky fishing has been slow but there's been lots of fish up shallow in the mornings. Anglers continue to report lots of lazy follows, so figure eights are an absolute necessity.

Note: If you're a novice and want to catch some fish this weekend, pick up a couple of lipless crankbaits (either rattletraps or rattling rapalas) and cast them around (but not into) any standing weeds you see. Cast it past the edges of the shallow weeds you see, and then as soon as the bait hits the water, reel quickly. I won't promise you a big one, but there will be some action.

Good luck.

Thursday, May 21, 2020

2020 Memorial Weekend Preview

Headed out for the Holiday weekend?

Casual fisherman? Here's a tip to put a couple gamefish in the boat this weekend: A lipless crankbait. Go to your local bait and tackle shop and ask for a lipless crankbait. In the old days, this was a Bill Lewis Rattletrap but they come in a rainbow of shapes and colors today. But one or two, and just cast and retrieve it over shallow flat areas. Rule 1 of the lipless crank: as fast as you can reel.

Keep the net handy as you'll have a shot at a mixed bag of bass, walleye and pike depending on where you're fishing.

Conditions around the area: Right now most lakes are in the high 50's to low 60's. Weed growth is way behind. Water remains high on most lakes and local rivers after the heavy rains, so make sure to check at the launches about possible slow-no-wake conditions.

Bluegills Current areas and sandy or gravel areas will hold the most fish. Smaller gills are shallow, but if you're looking for nice gills, try 8-12 feet of water. Regardless of depth, focus on sand/gravel areas for the best success. Leeches on a split shot rig are the best way to chase larger pannies, but Waxworms, redworms and plastics are taking fish.

Crappie fishing has been hit or miss. People are catching some nice crappies, but consistent numbers of keepers have been hard to produce. A few crappies are being caught over deeper water near mainlake structure, and you may still find a few spawning crappies are in shallow bays near weeds, wood laydowns or reeds. Minnows, hooked through the tail on a small hook (#8 or #10), waxworms and plastics have all been taking fish.

Largemouth Bass  are in the pre-spawn period. Buzzbaits and Lipless Crankbaits are catching fish over open water areas, especially weed patches on the mid-depth flats in 6-12 feet of water. Fish have been hard to pattern though, and you should be ready to be flexible. Lots of fish are schooled up, but with weeds in limited supply, and baitfish schools hard to pin down this season, you might have to actually cover some water to find fish consistently. If the topwater/crankbait bite is off downsize your plastics presentations. I caught a bunch of fish on an old school floating worm this week, but covering water with a grub or small ringworm filled in some gaps. The fish are active, but can be mighty spooky under these conditions, so be ready to make long casts. Plastics: Texas rigged lizards, tubes, skirted grubs, and wacky worms are all catching fish, but as always, if the bite is tough, try a jigworm. Browns and pumpkins have been outproducing greens and watermelons for me. Live bait on slip sinker rigs are catching a few fish for anglers making solid drifts over productive areas, but try to keep your leader a bit longer to keep you bait higher in the water column.

Smallmouth Bass fishing was getting good before the rain. Minnowbaits, like size 11 or 13 floating rapalas are actually a great way to catch these fish. Keep it simple, black and silver or chartruese and white are the best. Look for them early and late on sand/rock transition areas and  target them with tubes, skirted grubs or twister tail grubs. You can't go wrong with a lipless crankbait to find fish right now.

Walleye fishing has been off and on ith the weather. With limited weeds, fish are hard to pin down. Slip Bobbers, jigging with live bait or drifting with lindy rigs have been productive, especially when using small suckers or leeches for bait. In the evening, a few anglers are still catching fish by working rapala minnow baits over any isolated weed clumps on mainlake points and humps they can find.

Northern Pike fishing was slow, but steady. The best way to catch pike is a small sucker or medium to large shiner on a slip sinker rig with a flourocarbon leader. Drift along the deeper edges of the weeds you can find in 12-18 feet Up shallow- Lipless crankbaits, buzzbaits and spinner baits are still producing.

Musky fishing has been pretty slow with the sunny days. Anglers continue to report lots of lazy follows, so figure eights are an absolute necessity, and having a sucker out on a quick strike rig is always a good idea. Topwater and jerkbaits are still catching some fish, but with weeds hard to come by, plan on covering some water.

Thursday, April 30, 2020

2020 "Fishing Opener" Preview

Here's what to expect when you hit the water for the opener, which is less exciting than normal thanks to the new C+R bass season.

1.) Water temps in the low to mid fifties. Some isolated bays and boat channels may be approaching 60 degreesk. Nighttime temperatures will dictate most of what happens for the next run. The mix of cold rain and cool nights is keeping things from really getting going.

2.) Limited new growth of weeds, and not too many piers are in but more than normal for this time of year. Social distancing has more people on the lakes in boats.

3.) I'd  focus my efforts in the warmer parts of the day. You may need to make some adjustments throughout the weekend as conditions change.

4.) Live bait, fished slowly is going to be a great way to kick off the season. I'd fish for pike or bass. Muskie are just finishing their spawn, and may be a bit spooky,

5.) Local lakes are open, but the rivers will get active again with the rain we just had.


Panfish: Staging on weed flats and in marshy areas. Look for the warmest shallow water in the afternoons. Plastics tipped with waxworms, or small tail hooked minnows are catching fish, but they are running small. Strike zone is small, so make sure to make accurate casts if fishing for shallow, visible fish. (Best Local Options: Okauchee, Pine, Kessus, Nag, Lower Nashotah, Fowler, Middle Geneessee, Moose, Garvin and Golden)

Bass: Pre-Pre spawn. Look for small groups of fish to be cruising in the shallow water and look for bigger fish around the ends of points. Some of the early warming bays and channels may have some early bucks up in the shallow water, but I'd expect to see more schooling activity. Grubs, tubes and wacky are your best bets, but a jigworm or a swim jig might be the key approach. Don't overlook a lipless crankbait either. (Okauchee, Silver, Golden, Nag, Oconomowoc, Lac Labelle, Kessus, Pewaukee, Beaver)

Action will come in spurts, but look for warmer water and any green weeds you can find. If the sun is out, rocks can pull in fish later in the day as they absorb heat. Large fish can be caught on suspending jerkbaits or slow rolled spinnerbait on the deep edges of points near spawning coves. If you're seeing bigger fish in the shallows, jig and pig in a black/blue, black/red or rootbeer pattern will produce. If you can find some fish out deep, a texas rigged lizard can land you the biggest bass of the season right now.

Northern: Lots of fish on the flats. Live bait, buzzbaits or lipless crankbaits will produce the most fish. Probably your best option for early fishing this weekend if you're looking for steady action. Big fish will be one breakline deeper than where the active, smaller fish are. Chrome or reflective lipless crankbaits will get your line stretched for sure as will a slip sinker rig with a jumbo shiner or small sucker.(Moose, Kessus, Nag, Emily, Okauchee, Pretty, Golden)

Walleye: Lots of fish on the 6-12 foot deep flat areas. Especially around, but out of the current, and in any shallow standing weeds you can find. Jigging the channel edges or points, lindy rigging and drifting or slow death trolling are good options. #11 or #13 floating rapalas will pull up any bigger fish you come across. (Oconomowoc, Lac Labelle, Pine, Fox, Nag and North)

Musky: Live baiting with suckers, small bucktails and jerkbaits are your best options for the opener.  As I said, some fish are still roaming the shallows finishing the spawn, and you may seem them paired up in shallow water (Lac Labelle, Pewaukee, Okauchee, Oconomowoc, Garvin, Fowler and North)

Reminder that there was no trout stockings this year, so the usual opening weekend rush on Lower Genessee, Ottawa and Fowler may not be as pronounced.

Good Luck, Stay Safe and I'll see you out there.

Wednesday, April 22, 2020

Fishing Report 4-22-2020

Hey gang, it is still cold out there but some fish are biting.

Early spring conditions continue on the local lakes. Early warming, protected bays with dark sand or rock bottoms, or areas with current continue to give up some fish, especially in the late afternoons during the warmer parts of the day. Windy conditions have limited the days and areas people are fishing some.

Crappies and Bluegills can get active in the usual early spots. Look for them in shallow, protected areas with a north bank. Dark bottom areas with green weeds are especially good right now, but sandy areas near reeds will also produce. Small minnows, tail hooked, and suspended under a bobber is the best way to catch crappies, but if the bite is tough, don't overlook waxworms on an icefishing jig or a small red #10 hook as an option for both species.

Bay 5, Stumpy and Icehouse Bays, The Crane's Nest and the Channel on Okauchee are always areas that turn on early, as are Garvin (North end) Kessus, Golden, Pine (Both Ends) Moose, Fowler, Lac Labelle and the boat channels on Nagawicka.

Walleyes continue to bite on the Rock River in Jefferson. The walleye spawning runs are done for the most part, but fish are still being taken from shellbeds, rockpiles and in the channel swings. Jig and minnow, or jig and plastics (including ringworms) have been the best baits this year. While the walleyes have done their ritual, whitebass fishing has not been happening the way we'd expect. If we get some warm stable weather, things should turn on quickly.

There are a fair number of people out making use of the new catch and release season for bass. Although I haven't heard anything consistent about smallmouth, anglers putting in the time are getting slow but steady largemouth action working shallow areas with green weeds (especially flats outside of spawning areas) or around wood laydowns. Jig and chunk, or flipping a beaver or creature can put some fish in the boat. If you're finding fish, a texas rigged lizard can really get them going early in the season. If you're chasing a big one right now, use the biggest shiners you can find under a slip bobber around the ends of major points.

Musky Mikes Tuesday Night Big Bass League: Covid Protocol


COVID-19 UPDATE:

We ARE still having the Tuesday Night Bass Tournament starting May 5th, 2020, however there will be a few changes to keep our social distancing during this time. We are still having it held at the Hide Away, but they are closed. We will start 6pm and end at 9pm last boat must be docked. As far as Boat number assignments we will not be having you draw them, it will be done at random hat draw and it will be assigned to you prior to live well check. During live well checks you will be asked to exit your boat if we need to get on to see the live well. At 9pm if you do not have a fish please DO NOT RETURN. With that being said you will not be able to get off the boat until your boat number is called for weigh in’s, only 1 person off the boat at a time, you will return to your boat until winnings are called. We will announce the winners and at that time you will come get your winnings. Musky Mikes wants to be able to continue the Tournament during this time, so please lets work together and make this happen.
Thank you
Musky Mikes

Sunday, April 5, 2020

Fishing Report 4-5-2020 (Quarantine Edition #1)

Well, here we are.

Let's ignore the situation we're in and focus on the fishing close to home.

The water is cold.

First off, bass season (in the form of the new Catch and Release) season is open. But how does one catch bass this early in the year?

Well here are my top 3 approaches:

1.) Live bait. Although it can be hard to get with store closing and such, large shiners will produce, especially in water adjacent to structure in 22-30 FOW. On days where the sun is shining, look for early prespawn fish around the ends of long points outside of areas where bass will spawn.

2.) Jerkbait. We usually miss the jerkbait bite here, but cold water fishing with a suspended jerkbait is a real gem. I like Rouges personally, but this is a legacy of having fished down on Bull Shoals a great deal.

3.) Float and Fly. Always good for a few bites.

Now for the report: Crappies are starting to show up in the usual spring locations. Look for patches of weeds or laydowns close to deeper water. Small tail hooked minnow underneath a slip bobber is the best all around approach, but don't overlook a small #10 sized red hook with a waxworm or spike when the bite is tough. if you're out and find an active school, small tube or hair jigs can really go to town on them.

Its still a bit early for bluegills, but as the water warms over the next 10 days to two weeks, start to look for them in current areas. As the water gets into the low 50's, fish will start to gravitate towards north banks and areas of current. You can get right in a hurry if you find the right school and can make a subtle (ie quiet) presentation and not spook them.

Rock River walleye run is winding down, but the white bass are starting to run.

Back with more as I am out more often.

Stay safe.


Wednesday, February 26, 2020

Fishing Regulation Changes

There's changes on the Horizon, many of which will effect fishing in the local area:

New Fishing Regulations Effective April 1, 2020
MADISON, Wis. - A suite of updated statewide, regional and local Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources fishing regulations will go into effect on April 1, 2020, to provide good fishing opportunities for the public and help fulfill management goals.

Statewide and Regional Fishing Regulation Changes
A continuous catch-and-release season for bass at all times of the year outside the harvest season will apply statewide, except where refuges or closed areas are in effect. This season will apply to inland, outlying and boundary waters, and no bass may be harvested during the catch-and-release bass season. Waters with a current continuous bass harvest season will not see any changes.
The daily bag limit for cisco and whitefish will change from 25 pounds and one fish to 10 fish in total. This change will improve consistency in harvest limits among anglers and reduce pressure on inland cisco and whitefish populations.
The closing date of the muskellunge fishing season will be Dec. 31 on open water in the Northern Zone north of US Highway 10, including Wisconsin-Michigan boundary waters and outlying waters of Lake Michigan and Green Bay north of Waldo Boulevard in Manitowoc. Open water is considered to include any conditions that do not allow ice to be used as a platform for fishing.
On the Wisconsin-Michigan boundary waters, the musky season will open on June 1 and the minimum length limit for musky will be 50 inches.
For lake sturgeon fishing on Lake Superior, the minimum length limit will be 60 inches and only one sturgeon may be harvested per year.
On the Lake Winnebago System, the daily bag limit for walleye and sauger will decrease to three in total, with only one being a sauger. No size limit will apply. The Winnebago System includes Lakes Buttes des Morts, Winneconne, Poygan, Winnebago and all their tributaries from their mouths upstream to the first dam. This includes the Fox River from Lake Winnebago upstream to the dam above Princeton and all its tributaries from their mouths upstream to the first dam and the Wolf River from its mouth upstream to the dam in the city of Shawano and all its tributaries from their mouths upstream to the first dam including Cincoe lake, Partridge Crop lake and Partridge lake in Calumet, Fond du Lac, Green Lake, Marquette, Outagamie, Shawano, Waupaca, Waushara and Winnebago counties.
In water bodies of Shawano and Waupaca counties, excluding the Winnebago system and in Lake Koshkonong, the Rock River, the Crawfish River and their tributaries, the daily bag limit will also be three walleye, but with a minimum length limit of 18 inches.
For the Turtle-Flambeau Flowage and connected water bodies, including Trude Lake, the Bear River, the Flambeau River upstream of the Turtle-Flambeau Flowage at Murray's Landing, the Little Turtle River, and the Manitowish River upstream of the Flambeau River to the Rest Lake Dam, including Benson, Sturgeon and Vance lakes, the regulation for walleye will be a minimum length limit of 12 inches with only one fish over 15 inches allowed for harvest, and a daily bag limit of three
Mississippi River Fishing Regulation Changes Effective April 1
In Pools 3 through 8 of the Mississippi River, the daily bag limit for walleye and sauger will be four in total, with a 15-inch minimum length limit for walleye and none for sauger, and only one walleye or sauger over 20 inches allowed for harvest. In Pools 9 through 12, the daily bag limit for walleye and sauger will be six, with a 15-inch minimum length limit for walleye and none for sauger, a protected slot limit of 20 to 27 inches for walleye and only one walleye over 27 inches allowed for harvest.
For panfish in Pools 3 through 9, the daily bag limit for white and yellow bass will be reduced to 10 of each with no size limit, while the daily bag limit for sunfish, crappies and yellow perch will be reduced to 15 of each with no size limit.
The daily bag limit for shovelnose sturgeon in Pools 3 through 9 has been reduced to three, with no size limit.
The regulation for northern pike in Pools 3 through 9 will be a daily bag limit of three with only one over 30 inches.
For channel and flathead catfish in Pools 3 through 9, the daily bag limit will be 10 combined with only one catfish over 30 inches.
Local Fishing Regulation Changes
The refuge for the Mink River downstream to the river's mouth at Rowley Bay in Door County will change to March 1 to June 15. Between these dates, the fishing season will be closed in the refuge.
Fishing in the Fox River refuge below the DePere Dam in Brown County will be prohibited from March 1 to May 31.